T E R E S E    S V O B O D A             Guggenheim Fellow 2013

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2013 reissue
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Forthcoming:
Self-Avoiding Walks Jackleg Press

"Terese Svoboda is a true original." Emily St. John Mandel, The Millions.

"A fabulous fabulist," wrote Publishers Weekly about Svoboda’s writing in Tin God, her fourth novel.

Tin God is narrated by God — a woman, of course — and concerns the misadventures of a conquistador and two Midwestern dope dealers five hundred years later.

Bohemian Girl

Published by MadHat Press 3/8/13.


Bohemian Girl

A cross between True Grit and Huckleberry Finn, Bohemian Girl is the Bohemian answer to Willa Cather. Novelist Terese Svoboda lifts the shadows of American history as she illuminates one brave girl's determined quest for self-discovery.


ForeWord Historical Fiction Book of the Year 2012

Booklist Top 10 Western 2012

"She will, of course, compared to Willa Cather -- and deservedly so."
- Kurt Andersen, author of NY Times bestseller Heyday.

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Chicago Printers Row Lit Festival

Pirate Talk or Mermalade Reviews
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Pirate Talk or Mermalade is a novel in voices about two brothers who meet a mermaid, fall into pirating, and end up in the Arctic. Henry Hudson said "mermaids are as thick as shrimp in these parts," and fellow explorer (and pirate) Martin Frobisher dropped off part of his crew in the Arctic.
WEAPONS GRADE

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Los Angeles Festival of Books

Weapons Grade, Terese Svoboda's fifth collection of poetry, concerns the power of occupation—political and personal—that often plays with sestina, sonnet, and couplets, as if only form can contain the fury of an occupation. There's also elegy and lullaby and seduction but, in the words of the sixties tune "Wooly Bully," the reader must "Watch it now, watch it."
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Stark and disturbing, "Trailer Girl" is the story of cycles of child abuse and the dream to escape them. The stories that follow are full-strength, as strong and precise as poetry. "Svoboda's stories are haunting and profound." –A.M. Homes
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"Astounding!" reports the New York Post about Black Glasses Like Clark Kent, winner of the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize and published by Terese Svoboda in 2008. A memoir about her uncle as an MP who reported executions of GIs in the stockade he was guarding in postwar Japan and then committed suicide, Black Glasses Like Clark Kent is "a family romance in the guise of a biography and memoir, also a mystery in the spirit of writers as various as Dashiell Hammett and Sigmund Freud, Patricia Highsmith and D. W. Winnicott," writes Robert Polito.
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Treason concerns betrayal: child to parent, wife to husband, a nation to its people. Eleanor Wilner wrote of the collection: "Cool, wry surface: depth charge of cry, of outrage, language at the edge of utterance, utterly original, black-bordered, indelible as we are not."
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A Drink Called Paradise tells of the wet, lush decay of an island inhabited by living ghosts, islanders moving in the shadow of bombs that detonated fifty years ago. One of the ten best reads of the summer--Voice Literary Supplement
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Cannibal won the Bobst Prize and the Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writer's Award and was chosen as one of the top ten books of the year by Spin magazine and hailed as a "women's 'Heart of Darkness'" by Vogue
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All of the medical, technological and psychological advances of the 20th century struggle against humankind's being made up of "mere mortals".
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Winner of the Iowa Poetry Prize.
Featured in the NY Times Book Review
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Publisher’s Weekly feature, American Library Association "Notable Book" nominee
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The Nuer, a cattle herding people who live along the Nile, were made famous by anthropologist E. Evans Pritchard's classic text on social anthropology. Svoboda's translations are aided by a linking narrative which chronicles her experiences and gives us a deeper glimpse into the often hard lives of the Nuer.

"Writer's Choice" in New York Times Book Review